Thermoplastic Composites

Resins

Thermoplastic resins are divided into two groups: amorphous and crystalline.

Amorphous resins typically melt over a wide temperature range and have superior toughness, impact resistance, and damage tolerance. The high-volume amorphous resins include:

The higher-performance (higher melt temperature) amorphous resins include:

Crystalline and semicrystalline resins typically have a sharp melt point and a lower melt viscosity than amorphous resins. Because of the crystalline structure they are usually stiffer and stronger than amorphous resins. The principal crystalline resins are:

Substrates

Types of Fibers

Fiber length

Continuous fiber reinforcement (CFR) provides the greatest strength and stiffness. We also use some long fiber (.25" - 1")

Fiber forms

Available Thermoplastic Resin-Substrate Combinations

  Reinforcement
Glass Kevlar Carbon
Resin Woven Uni Nonwoven Woven Uni Nonwoven
HDPE
High-density polyethylene
  X X     X X
PP
Polypropylene
X X X   X X X
PET
Polyethylene terthalate
X X X   X   X
PBT
Polybutylene terephthalate
X       X    
PES
Polyether sulfone
X   X X X   X
PA 6/66
Polyamide
(nylon)
X X X X X X X
PA 11/12
Polyamide
(nylon)
X X X X X X X
PPSU
Polyphenylsulfone
X   X X X   X
PUR
Polyurethane
X X   X X   X
PPS
Polyphenylene sulfide
X X X X X X X
PEI
Polyetherimide
X X X X X X X
PEEK
Polyether ether ketone
X X X X X X X
Other We believe we can work with
any thermoplastic resin.

Special Capabilities

Effects of Continuous Fiber Reinforcement

Continuous fiber reinforcement (CFR) increases the performance of thermoplastic resins to levels unheard of in neat resins.

[Graph of effects of continuous fiber reinforcement]